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Northern Gas Pipelines is your public service 1-stop-shop for Alaska and Canadian Arctic energy commentary, news, history, projects and people. It is informal and rich with new information, updated daily. Here is the most timely and complete Arctic gas pipeline and northern energy archive available anywhere—used by media, academia, government and industry officials throughout the world. Northern Gas Pipelines may be the oldest Alaska blog; we invite readers to suggest others existing before 2001.

 

2011 Archives

10-9-11

09 October 2011 12:04pm

A Sunny (Mojonnier) Outlook From California ...  (For Editorial, Flip Four Pages)  

Fairbanks News Miner Editorial.  ...   The report, to which the Daily News-Miner was given limited access by Mr. van Meurs’ company, bluntly states that Alaska’s current oil tax system isn’t working. 

Anchorage Daily Planet by Tom Brennan (NGP Photo).  Alaska could use some good news on its Tom Brennan by Dave Harbour, OCS, Chukchi, Anchorage Daily Planet, Beauforteconomy, but don’t look at me for it. Alan Bailey, Petroleum News Alaska, by Dave Harbour, OCS, Chukchi, Beaufort Sea, ANS, BOEMREThere is a little good news, but not much, I’m afraid.  The good news is that Shell Oil cleared another hurdle for its plan to drill exploratory oil wells in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska’s northwest coast....One piece of the bad news is that the challenge to the sale by green activists now goes back to the court system, where it could get tied in knots again.      *     ADN/PN by Alan Bailey (NGP Photo).  "We feel we have some very strong permits, and we feel that there is reason to be optimistic that our permits will survive a court challenge," Pete Slaiby, Shell's vice president in Alaska, told Petroleum News Sept. 30. "Litigation will always be a risk we have."   ...  "Allowing Shell to drill when it has no credible plan to clean up an oil spill in the Arctic's icy waters, and instead simply assume it can clean up 95 percent of oil spilled isn't just unrealistic, it's insulting and irresponsible," said Earthjustice attorney Holly Harris."  ... "I believe we have a very robust oil spill response plan," Slaiby said. "It was robust before Deepwater Horizon and has become even more robust since then," he said.      *      AGC by George Tuckness. History has shown that we cannot tax ourselves to prosperity. In fact, tax reductions have been the prevailing practice across the country for attracting business, keeping business, stimulating the economy and keeping people employed.  Through the regular 90 day session and 27 days of a special session, 375 bills were introduced and 28 passed by both bodies. There was a lot of talk but, unfortunately Oil tax reform measures as proposed in HB110 were...

 

10-7-11

07 October 2011 7:03am

Oil Drum Via Alaska Dispatch.  Problems are developing in the flow of oil from Alaska to the rest of the United States. Based on a falling volume of oil produced from the existing fields in the North Slope, the delivery pipeline from Deadhorse to Valdez is approaching levels of flow which will make it more difficult to deliver that oil.

10-6-11

06 October 2011 2:51pm

John Katz by Dave Harbour, Alaska, Washington D.C. Government Relations, Congress, OCS, BLM, DOE, DOI, NOAA, DOD, USFWS, ESAPNA.  John Katz (NGP Photo) told Gov. Sean Parnell that he recently turned 68 and wants to spend more time with family. He also said he has become increasingly discouraged by what he sees as the “polarization and deterioration of the public policy process at the federal level.”

10-5-11

05 October 2011 3:00pm

Dave Harbour Photo by Gaétan Caron, Regulatory Commission of Alaska, National Energy BoardJuneau Empire.  The Alaska Gasline Development Corp. (AGDC) has selected former Regulatory Commission of Alaska Chairman Dave Harbour (Gaétan Caron Photo) as its new director of external affairs.  AGDC is a subsidiary of Alaska Housing Finance Corp. It sprung from House Bill 369 last year to study feasibility options for a pipeline plan to move North Slope natural gas from the Interior to Southcentral Alaska.  Harbour said his job will be interacting with stakeholders, legislators and the media concerning these developments.

10-4-11

04 October 2011 6:20am

 ADN/AP by Dan Joling.  A lawsuit that stands in the way of Shell Oil's plans for exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska's northwest coast is back in the hands of a federal judge.

 

The Obama administration on Monday affirmed a controversial offshore oil lease sale... 
 
In half a heartbeat the Obama team could put the kibosh...
 
Newly released government emails reveal...
 
Politco ‘Ben Smith Blog’: Paul Elliott, puppetmaster?
Environmental groups opposed to the Keystone XL pipeline ...

 

11-3-11

03 October 2011 1:39am

Calgary Herald by Stephen Elwart.  Alison Redford has a unique opportunity to change the Alberta government’s relationship with the oil and gas industry in her first week on the job during hearings in Washington to debate the contentious Keystone XL oil pipeline.   

Keystone XL Pipeline Information.  MetalMiner: The Keystone XL Pipeline: Costs and Benefits - Houston Chronicle: Environmentalists challenge Shell’s Arctic drilling plan - Houston Chronicle: TransCanada ramping up lobbying to win Keystone approval - Salon: What's the future of the oil economy?

 

ALASKA GASLINE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION ANNOUNCES EXTERNAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR

 

 

Life After The Pipeline? - Keystone Progress

02 October 2011 5:38pm

Calgary Herald by Rebecca Penty.  As the final hours of public hearings on one of North America's largest energy projects were set to begin, Russ Girling was taking in a bird's-eye view of his company's planned megapipeline route through a key battleground - Nebraska.  Having ditched his suit and tie for work boots after meetings in Washington over the $7-billion, 2,700-kilometre cross-border Keystone XL, the TransCanada Corp. CEO tracked the pipeline's right-of-way over the state 30 metres up in a helicopter.

ADN by Sean Cockerham.  A new report from the University of Alaska Anchorage says the transition to Dr. Scott Goldsmith, ISER, University of Alaska Anchorage, Economist, Oil and Gas, TAPS Throughputa "post-Prudhoe economy" will be the biggest challenge for Alaska over the next decade, a warning that comes as the state's politicians bicker over what to do about oil taxes and a natural gas pipeline.  The report by UAA's Institute of Social and Economic Research (download PDF here) says the dollars coming to the state treasury as a result of high oil prices have masked the long decline in Alaska oil production and given the state a reprieve to find a solution. The report found reason for optimism: Alaska still has great potential in petroleum resources and, if high oil prices hold, the state could collect many billions more in oil revenues "before the conventional reserves on state lands are used up."  ...  "But any number of roadblocks could derail a smooth transition. We all have a natural tendency to avoid decisions that require sacrifice in the near term to achieve a longer term goal," concluded ISER economist Scott Goldsmith (NGP Photo- above-left), who wrote the report.  ...   This comes as the rhetoric among politicians over oil taxes is ratcheting up. Gov. Sean Parnell (NGP Photo-upper right) seems to take every opportunity to push his plan to slash state taxes on oil companies, saying it will make the state more competitive for investment.    ...  Rep. Les Gara (NGP Photo-r) argued the state could be doing more to encourage a natural gas pipeline to the Lower 48, through providing more Bob Wilkins and Army Kirschbaumloan guarantees or becoming a part owner of the pipeline to lower its tariff and make the project more economic. Oil production will also go up if companies are out exploring the North Slope for natural gas, he said.

Personal:  The ADN noted a story about Alaskan Arts Icon Dr. Robert Wilkins (NGP Photo-l) and honored your publisher by first illustrating the piece with his photo, and, second, by including a series of his event photos, here.

Categories:

Governor Sean Parnell Champions Alaska Minerals and Energy

01 October 2011 5:35pm

Recent links to Governor Sean Parnell's Energy and Minerals Statements:

 

 

Enviros and Allies Continue Assault On Alaska OCS

30 September 2011 2:25pm

ADN/AP by Dan Jolling.   More than a dozen Alaska Native and environmental organizations sued Thursday to block offshore oil drilling in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast.

Mackenzie/Keystone Projects Could Boost Canada's Economy - North Dakota Supports TransCanada's Keystone Pipeline - ANGDA Board Reviews Alaska Gas Projects

29 September 2011 3:32am

Canadian economist, Avery Shenfeld, has a plan to boost Canada's economy...and it involves the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline (Montreal Gazette Story by Jay Bryan).  *  Calgary Herald by Amy ChungOttawa can create millions of jobs and build its way out of a difficult economy by backing energy megaprojects such as the Keystone XL pipeline, former environment minister Jim Prentice (NGP Photo) said Wednesday.

This Alaska Natural Gas Development Authority (ANGDA) September 22 Board packet, released last week, enables readers to review that organization's Alaska natural gas related activities and observations.  

 KTUU.  U.S. Rep. Don Young (NGP Photo) says he wants to introduce legislation to repeal every federal regulation put into effect since 1991.  The Alaska Republican says his bill is simple. He would "just null and void" any regulations passed in the past two decades.

ADN/AP.  Gov. Sean Parnell says oil exploration and environmental responsibility are compatible. He made the comments Saturday on the Fox News program "Huckabee."

ADN, by Sean Cockerham.  report by UAA's Institute of Social and Economic Research (download PDF here) says the dollars coming to the state treasury as a result of high oil prices have masked the long decline in Alaska oil production and given the state a reprieve to find a solution. The report found reason for optimism: Alaska still has great potential in petroleum resources and, if high oil prices hold, the state could collect many billions more in oil revenues "before the conventional reserves on state lands are used up."  "But any number of roadblocks could derail a smooth transition. We all have a natural tendency to avoid decisions that require sacrifice in the near term to achieve a longer term goal," concluded ISER economist Scott Goldsmith, who wrote the report. "Obvious challenges to planning for the future include not focusing on the problem, not believing it's urgent, not understanding the issues, and not trusting government to act in the interests of the average Alaskan."

Winnipeg Free Press/AP.  - State regulators in North Dakota say they support a controversial pipeline that would carry oilsands crude from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, though they want it built in a responsible manner.  TransCanada Corp.'s proposed 2,700-kilometre Keystone XL pipeline could carry Canadian crude as well as oil from the Williston Basin in western North Dakota and eastern Montana to downstream markets, the Industrial Commission said in endorsing the project Tuesday.  "It is important that this pipeline be constructed and operated in a manner that will protect the citizens of the United States," the governor, attorney general and agriculture commissioner said in a letter to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  The proposed pipeline has drawn opposition from people who fear it will harm the environment. Calgary-based TransCanada (TSX:TRP) says the $7 billion project would meet strict environmental standards.  The U.S. State Department is  considering whether to approve the project. Hearings are being held this week in the six states the pipeline route would cross. A meeting was planned Thursday in Pierre, S.D. North Dakota, which is now the fourth-largest U.S. oil producer, is not one of the states the pipeline would cross. The pipeline will pass through neighbouring Montana.  "As North Dakota continues to expand its oil production, we must also expand the distribution system," Gov. Jack Dalrymple (NGP Photo) said. "It's important that we have a system that can handle our growing Williston Basin production, and the Keystone pipeline can help do just that."