5-22-18 Big Alaska Energy Conference: Next Week In Anchorage! -and- Are Alaskans Thinking Strategically?

Dear Readers:  This is one of the most useful, timely conferences for those interested in Alaska energy issues and developments.  For those living in Canada, or the Lower 48, we know that if you attend it will have been well worth the trip!  -dh


AOGA 2018 Conference and Exhibit Hall

“The Great Debate”

Gubernatorial Debate on Oil and Gas Issues

Thursday, May 31, 2018

7:00 am to 5:30 pm

AOGA staff photo, left to right: Brandon Brefczynski, Tamara Sheffield, Kara Moriarty, Joshua Kindred.

Dena’ina Civic & Convention Center | Anchorage AK

The Alaska Oil and Gas Association (AOGA) will feature another all-star lineup for this year’s conference and exhibit hall. With speakers from across Alaska and the United States, this year’s event will again be the “place to be” on May 31.

In addition to featuring top-tier speakers, AOGA will award a private scholarship to the University of Alaska based on essays submissions by high school students across the state, and award individuals and companies in the oil and gas industry in Alaska for their achievements. There are four awards for consideration- Contractor of the Year for Safety Performance Award sponsored by the Alaska Industry Support Alliance, Project of the Year Award for Environmental Stewardship and Innovation sponsored by Stoel Rives, Rising Star Award for young professionals working in the oil and gas industry, and the Marilyn Crockett Lifetime Achievement Award.

Preliminary Conference Agenda – check back for updates

Conference and Registration Information

Marilyn Crockett. Northern Gas Pipelines photo by Dave Harbour

Pat Foley. Northern Gas Pipelines photo by Dave Harbour

2018 AOGA Awards Information – Awards will be presented at AOGA’s conference

Click here to view archive of 2017 Conference.

Do Alaskans think strategically?

Has anyone asked if the Anchorage utilities proposing to merge (ML&P and CEA) have considered whether it is in their interest for Fairbanks to ignore the nearly limitless North Slope gas reserves?  Do existing consumers think it a good idea to create a big Fairbanks natural gas utility from limited gas reserves upon which Southcentral Alaska depends for its own gas (Enstar) and electric utilities?  Fairbanks officials want to benefit from a state subsidized gas utility and also from low gas prices which a developer is proposing.  Needless to say, if Fairbanks citizens decide en masse to convert their furnaces for gas there will be more demand for the limited Cook Inlet supply, putting pressure on prices.  We think it likely that  some Alaska politicians have learned to play checkers reasonably well, but not chess.  -dh

IGU board considers Siemens proposal for alternative natural gas source for Fairbanks.  An affiliate of the Germany-based industrial giant Siemens is offering to build an LNG plant near Wasilla and transport the gas…


Canada

Yes, the ‘anti’ oil & gas forces are alive and well in Canada, as in the U.S.  When readers review this article, consider the source.  Then realize that an earlier generation of today’s activists worked with the Berger Commission to develop a record that denied construction of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline (Arctic Gas) in the 1970s.  When the project was repurposed Circa. 2010, North America was on the verge of the great Shale phenomenon which put what may be a final stake through the heart of that effort.  But activists and their political representatives who deny Alberta reserves transportation access to the East and West coasts may be more effective in putting a stake through the heart of Canada’s entire economy for generations to come.  This is because fossil fuel wealth development is the foundation upon which rests the entire superstructure of civilization.  –dh

Trans Mountain pipeline debate: must Big Oil always shaft our democracy?  NOW Magazine (Reminder: consider the source and the leftist background of the author)  Go back 62 years to the great Pipeline Debate of 1956. … the environmental, economic and social impact of the proposed Mackenzie Valley Pipeline.


From: Fraser InstituteMorneau’s Trans Mountain pipeline promise creates a dangerous precedent.  by Charles Lammam, and Hugh MacIntyrKinder Morgan stopped all “non-essential spending” on the $7.4 billion project due to regulatory, legal and political barriers.


Long weekend gas prices: Headed higher most places, but Alberta, Quebec can expect a break.  CBC.ca.  Motorists in many parts of Canada are expected to see rising gasoline … on the fully-booked Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby, B.C..


Tulsa-based Williams buys all shares of unit in $10.5B deal.  Calgary Herald.  Williams Companies owns nearly 75 per cent of Williams Partners, which owns and operates more than 33,000 miles of pipelines, including the …


More from Fraser:


Russia

The Latest: Putin: Europe must help Syria rebuild.  Calgary Herald.  Russian President Vladimir Putin says that gas supplies to Europe via … Germany wants Russia’s gas and has calculated that the new pipeline will …


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About the Author:

Dave Harbour, publisher of Northern Gas Pipelines, is a former Chairman of the Regulatory Commission of Alaska, a Commissioner Emeritus of NARUC, NARUC's Official Representative to IOGCC and Vice Chairman of NARUC's Gas Committee. He served as Gas Committee Chairman of the Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners. He also served as commissioner of the Anchorage Bicentennial Commission and the Anchorage Heritage Land Bank Commission.He earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree: English, at Colorado State University, a Master of Science Degree: Communications-Journalism at Murray State University and graduated from Utility Regulatory School for Commissioners at Michigan State University. He served as a Vice President for Communications and Public Affairs at Alaska Pacific University, taught bank marketing classes at the University of Alaska and was an English teacher at Los Alamos High School.Harbour served in ranks of Private - Captain during a 4-year assignment with the Army in Korea, Idaho, Georgia and Fort Meade and received the Meritorious Service Medal among other commendations.Harbour is also a past Chairman of the Alaska Council on Economic Education, the Alaska Oil & Gas Association Government Affairs Committee, the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce, the Export Council of Alaska and the Department of Commerce's District Export Council. He is a past President of the Alaska Press Club, American Bald Eagle Foundation, Consumer Energy Alliance-Alaska and Common Sense for Alaska.Harbour was instrumental in founding the American Bald Eagle Research Institute (UAS), the Alaska Support Industry Alliance, the Downtown Anchorage Business Partnership, and Arctic Power.He also served as CEO of several small Alaska organizations, including the Anchorage Parking Authority and Action Security, Inc. Harbour is also Chairman Emeritus of the Alaska Oil & Gas Congress.Harbour's wife, Nancy, is a professional, performing arts administrator and his three boys, Todd, Benjamin and William work in the fields of environmental management, energy marketing and medicine.